History of West Papua – Encyclopedia Britannica

History

The first Europeans to sight the island of New Guinea were the Portuguese in 1511, and what is now the Indonesian portion of the island was subsequently visited by Spanish, Dutch, German, and English explorers. The English attempted to found a colony near Manokwari in 1793. The Dutch claimed the western half of New Guinea in 1828, but their first permanent administrative posts, at Fakfak and Manokwari, were not set up until 1898. Haji Misbach, a Muslim communist, was exiled by the Dutch to western New Guinea in 1924, and three years later about 1,300 communists were imprisoned there after an uprising in Java. The Japanese occupied the northern part of Dutch New Guinea during World War II until Allied forces recaptured the town of Hollandia (now Jayapura, in the province of Papua) in 1944. The Netherlands regained sovereignty of western New Guinea at the end of the war and retained it after officially recognizing Indonesia’s independence in 1949. In 1962, after protracted negotiations, the region was placed under United Nations administration, and in 1963 it was transferred to Indonesia, with the provision that a plebiscite would be held by 1969 to determine its future status.

Opposition to Indonesian rule, led by the Free Papua Movement (Organisasi Papua Merdeka; OPM), erupted almost immediately. The plebiscite took place in 1969, and, although the results were widely viewed as suspect, the area became the Indonesian province of Irian Jaya. The OPM continued to resist Indonesian rule, and violence broke out periodically. In 1999 B.J. Habibie, then president of Indonesia, divided the area into three provinces: Irian Jaya, Central Irian Jaya, and West Irian Jaya. Largely perceived as a “divide-and-rule” maneuver, the partition met with strong local opposition and consequently was annulled the following year by Habibie’s successor, Abdurrahman Wahid. Wahid not only returned the region to the status of a single province but also granted it a significant degree of autonomy.

In January 2002, just a few months after Megawati Sukarnoputri assumed the presidency, Irian Jaya officially changed its name to Papua. Meanwhile, Megawati resurrected the idea of dividing the province, and in 2003, without consulting the residents of Papua or the local government, the province was split into West Irian Jaya (Irian Jaya Barat) and Papua. An interim governor was appointed for West Irian Jaya, and a legislature was installed the following year. Although the constitutionality of the division of the province was disputed for some years, Papua and West Irian Jaya were officially recognized as separate entities by Megawati’s successor, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. Both provinces held direct general elections in 2006, and in 2007 West Irian Jaya became known as West Papua.

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